• Posts by Mark J. Chumley
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    Mark Chumley has experience representing management in all aspects of labor and employment law. He has handled numerous cases before state and federal courts and state and federal civil rights agencies, including claims ...

Attorney Mark Chumley provides practical insights into the challenges facing businesses today. Employment at-will is the default rule in almost every state. Where did it come from, what does it mean and what does it do for employers today?

Attorney Mark Chumley provides practical insights into the challenges facing businesses today. You've probably heard about COVID-19 immunity laws being passed but how much protection do they really provide for employers?  Also, did you ever wonder where the phrase "You're fired" came from?

Attorney Mark Chumley provides practical insights into the challenges facing businesses today. If you are planning a reduction in force (RIF) in the current business and legal environment, there are several factors to be considered.

Between COVID-19 and social unrest, this year has seen many reservists and other members of the military called to active duty.  Unfortunately, military leave seems to be an issue with which even sophisticated employers struggle.  While not an exhaustive list, here are five things for employers to bear in mind about military leave.

  1. USERRA is extremely broad. The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), which protects civilian employment of military personnel, is very broad. Unlike most employment laws, it applies to almost all employers regardless of ...

Earlier this month, the Ohio legislature passed and the Governor signed into law House Bill 606, which provides qualified immunity to employers who are accused of spreading COVID-19. It goes into effect on December 13, 2020 and covers conduct between March 9, 2020 and September 30, 2021.  The new law provides immunity for businesses from customers and employees bringing lawsuits alleging exposure, transmission, or contraction of COVID-19 in a place of business, unless the owner’s or employer’s actions amounted to reckless conduct or willful misconduct.  This is obviously good ...

On September 22, 2020, President Trump issued an Executive Order on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping that prohibits federal contractors and grantees from engaging in many forms of diversity, inclusion, and implicit bias training. 

The Order requires that government agencies to include in every new government contract, provisions barring the contractor from using workplace training that inculcates in its employees any form of race or sex stereotyping or any form of race or sex scapegoating, including concepts that:

  1. one race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex;

As summer winds down, a lot of attention has been given to schools resuming classes.  Some schools are meeting in person fully or partially but many have moved to online classes for the foreseeable future.  Even schools meeting in person may be forced to change course depending on circumstances, e.g. students or teachers contracting COVID-19.  All of this means a great deal of uncertainty for working parents and a major issue for employers who will have to manage attendance and leave issues. 

As the COVID-19 threat lingers and businesses look for ways to protect their employees, there has been a lot of talk about contact tracing in the workplace.  As the name suggests, contact tracing is a process of determining who an infected individual has had contact with and possibly exposed to a disease. This is not a new process and in the past has been done by interviewing people to create lists of exposed individuals who could be warned or isolated.  With modern technology, there are a lot more options, some of which employers are considering using in the workplace.

As businesses begin the process of re-opening, many are finding that due to changed conditions, they are overstaffed. One possible solution to this problem is a reduction in force (RIF). In planning a RIF, there are a great many factors for employers to consider in the current environment, including the points listed below.

As employers bring employees back into the workplace, many are considering various forms of testing as a means to promote employee safety. While some forms of testing are fairly straightforward, such as taking employees’ temperatures, laboratory testing for COVID-19 is not as simple. 

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